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labs are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project
are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the li
with countries around the world in deeper trade, investment in science and technology, development, all efforts that can spark economic growth for all of our people. such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. four partnerships to be affective, our citizens must be secured and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger, one based on dividing the world between us and them, if it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to those forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed and in benghazi a turkish police officer was killed days before his wedding. several afghan children were more by their parents just days after they were killed by a suicide bomber in kabul. it may initially be focused on the west, but over time it cannot be contained. the same impulses of extremism is used to justify war between tribes and clans. it
is a film called "looper," the science fiction film that just played toronto that i just got back from. it's a really wonderful film with joseph gordon-levitt and bruce willis. i really hope people take a chance on it, 'cause it's a lot of fun, a lot of great action, and a lot of great ideas, which we don't have in movies these days. > > i have to tell you, i am very much enjoying the movie trailer to "won't back down." > > it kind of looks like an oscar contender doesn't it? just the way it's got viola davis, maggie gyllenhaal- > > two good actresses. > > yeah, but, you know, fox is not, they didn't really put this movie in the film festivals, so they're just kind of quietly releasing it here at the end of september. it has the look and feel of an oscar contender, but i really don't hold a whole lot of hope out for it. > > so september just kind of a month ... > > something we can write off. there's going to be some better stuff next month we can talk about. > > we will see you next month. that's erik childress, he is vice-president of the chicago film critics' association, joins us every
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
. >> translator: i'm confident in the results and that the creation of a new element is a big step for science. >> there are 94 elements that exist naturally. 20 others have been created by scientists. >>> after months of wrangling deployment of a fleet of u.s. aircraft is about to take place. defense ministry officials say that 12 osprey will be deployed to the u.s. marine corps in okinawa prefecture as early as friday. ahead the deployment, officials from local municipalities were offered a test ride on the aircraft to ease their concerns. but few have accepted the offer. the test ride will take place on thursday at the air station in yamaguchi prefecture. the fleet of 12 osprey is currently undergoing atmosphere tests at the base ahead of deployment. but 19 of the 22 invited municipalities told nhk they have rejected the offer. the officials say they have other commitments. in the city where the aircraft will be deployed officials have declined the offer. they say they don't want to give the impression that they now think the aircraft is safe. officials from three municipalities say they w
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
-based international academy of television, art, and sciences oversees the awards. its members include about 500 media and entertainment companies. >>> for an update on the weather forecast, here's mai shoji. mai? >>> indeed, it is the typhoon season, but one after another we have storms coming in. we have a couple of storms to talk about. let's start off with this one. this is the tropical storm maliksi. it is moving towards the islands. throughout the day tomorrow, the islands will be affected due to this storm and it will be intensifying into a secure tropical storm status by wednesday evening. from the afternoon, actually, it will be around this region, so it will be quickly moving away. maliksi is a fast-moving system. it will be picking up its pace tomorrow. but the ting that this will be doing is it will be enhancing the stationary boundary, which is just south of the eastern coast of the toho ka region. due to that earn jized stationary front, thunderstorms will be affecting the eastern region especially and some heavy down tour pours to be looking out for. another storm is the kami over the s
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
of marine science says the number of reefs has dropped from 100 to 47. since 1985. the scientists identified two main causes of coral decline. the crown of thorn star fish is growing rapidly in number. the fish feed on the coral. and ocean warming is bleaching the coral. the scientists say this prevents the reef from recovering after cyclone damage. they worn coral cover could halve again by the end of the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe that if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorn starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of these climatic impacts. >> the reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia. >>> officials and locals in india pulled together to pull one endangered species from the mud. they spent ten hours digging an indian rhinoceros from a swamp in the northeastern state. about 2,300 rhinos live in the national park, two-thirds of the world's population of the endangered animal. one of the rhinos strayed from the park after it was hit by fl
sophisticated mathematics and the science behind meteorology. we used data from many sources - data coming from the national weather service, data coming from farms - to predict not just the weather, but how that weather impacts farms. > > lloyd, tell me, what exactly does this do? what does this information do for, say, the farmer? > > well, instead of getting a generic and fairly vague weather forecast, we can provide a detailed forecast of when and where it might rain tomorrow on the farm, and more importantly, how that would affect the operations. so when i talk to farmers, one of the things that they tell me is a big challenge, especially in the drought-stricken season, is irrigation. they want to be much more efficient at using water, and they want to schedule that ahead of time. that's dependent on where and when it will rain tomorrow - the temperature, the humidity. the idea is that we not only predict the weather, but we can predict the schedule of the irrigation, where and when the water would need to be applied. > > is this being rolled out now, being put into use? > > well, we've ac
on the global list of whether it is science, engineering, technology, whatever it may b. what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low in so many key area a's? why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it is priorities and values and greed. at the end of the day it is greed and lack of leadership to the point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money on prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacturer things in america. i don't get it. >> general? >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. one thing we have with american manufacturing is we are an older manufacturing economy. we are used to paper orders and contract processes and other things if you go to china and look at a network like ali bab ba they have sourcing electronically. one thing we can do move is move to the internet age in our manufacturing in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as, or should it be a global trading p
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. oh, hey alex. just picking up some, brochures, posters copies of my acceptance speech. great! it's always good to have a backup plan, in case i get hit by a meteor. wow, your hair looks great. didn't realize they did photoshop here. hey, good call on those mugs. can't let 'em see what you're drinking. you know, i'm glad we're both running a nice, clean race. no need to get nasty. here's your "honk if you had an affair with taylor" yard sign. looks good. [ male announcer ] fedex office. now save 50% on banners. i'm an expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. massmutual. we'll help you get there. >>> as an investor, you simply cannot afford to be wedded to your own opinions. you've got
could save lives. >> today we're looking at science-fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. the self-driving car. >> reporter: despite the notion he's an old retread, governor jerry brown arrived at google's headquarters in a self-driving car to accelerate california's leadership in self-driverless cars. google has lost 300,000 miles in this new technology. a new law allows driverless cars on the public roads as long as there's a licensed driver behind the wheel. it directs the dmv to adopt regulations. the governor signed the legislation in front of an audience of google employees. google co-founder was asked when the public might get their hands on this vehicle. >> i don't want to over promise right now. we have some pretty ambitious targets. you can see them stressing and looking at me. >> reporter: but he did say five years or less and he believes it will save lives. 99% of all traffic and fatal accidents are caused by human error. >> i expect driverless cars will be far safer. >> reporter: with cameras and scanner laser it opens the possibility of the blind driving. cutting down
is absolutely right, we need more of stem education, science, engineering, math, technology. there is a clear path to solving this problem. it basically must recognize we have to start producing as much or more than we consume. this whole thing about going to the walmart, yeah, it's cheap there but we have to understand the consequences. >> let me ask you about this. consumer confidence is up, a n cnnorc poll asks how the economy will be a year from now. two-thirds think it will be in better shape. that american optimism is critical but we can't fall into the traps by buying cheap stuff we don't need, it's all imported. >> nobody says it's not needed. imagine living without your iphone. >> a pair of tennis shoes. >> i agree with the point our new growth and prosperity will be made out of technology and we need education. we can't do that by bashing china. i tell you why. they are the largest foreign holder of our now $16 trillion national debt. they own over $1 trillion of u.s. treasuries. they lend to us. we buy stuff, they get dollars and then they invest back into our treasury bills, clo
problem with things that are preventable in health care. areason's i got into this of the science of medical mistakes -- ever since i got into this area of science of medical mistakes, people have come up with all kinds of stories. people come up after conferences and it is almost as if somebody has a story of somebody they know or somebody they love. host: who is responsible? guest: i think there are no villains in this game. i think everybody is well intended. we have an opportunity for hospitals to increase the level of accountability by disclosing their patient outcomes. doctors' groups have come together and endorsed great ways to measure hospital quality. 2,000 track them at the patient level. do we think the public has a right to know about the quality of their hospitals? host: haven't we been tracking outcomes for 50 years? we just keep increasing the outcomes but it hasn't improved. guest: absolutely. there are all kinds of outcomes to attract. services grow and every hospital. a lot of people are falling through the cracks. we have great measures that doctors' groups i j
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
the social science dictum that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. as a wire service guy, i am not in the prognostication business, but i feel fairly safe going out on a limb in a couple of things today. eight months ago, in the state of the union speech, obama issued an appeal to congress to spend more federal money on construction projects that would generate jobs. what he said was, take the money we are no longer spending at war. use half of the to pay down our debt. use the rest to do some nation building right here at home. we pointed out in a fact check that night the fallacy of that idea. the idea that some kind of budget surplus is going to be created when you stop the wars is fiscal fiction. those wars have been primarily financed by borrowing. if you stop the wars, you do not have new money, you just have less debt being added. it does not treat a pool of ready cash. on top of that, the supposed savings of this supposed peace dividend is inflated because it is based on spending numbers that are extrapolated into the future that would come from the height of the
technologies, gtat, and gilead sciences. >> i'm going to say point blank, i'm going to give you why this is not a diversified portfolio. it's got too much high risk in terms of stocks. chipotle's is wild. only intel with a 4% yield is not spec. and gilead is a highly up and down crazy stock, that said, okay, you have an internet company, you've got a tech company, you've got a tech company that's very, very similar. keep intel. you have a biotech company and you have a food company. i need to see some diversified industrials. something like a ge in there would really help. and then i think we'll be in good shape. but please, cut the risk profile because a down 100 day, that portfolio is going to be down 5%. let's go to jimbo in michigan. >> thanks for taking my call. my five stocks are apple, aapl, intuitive surgical, isrg, pepsico, pep, johnson and johnson, jnj, disney, dis. am i diversified, jim? >> let's go to work here. for jimbo, which is what my sister nan always calls me. j and j, pharmaceutical, pepsi, disney, entertainment, intuitive surgical and apple is technology, you go
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> i've been warning you for months, there is an economic storm coming our way from europe and you need to take cover. i've given you reasons why. i pointed my finger at politicians who aren't doing enough to shelter you. i argued with economists, i even blamed you for your part in this. after all that, i got to give you some props. all you see is sunshine and blue skies ahead. despite those threatening thunder clou thunderclouds out of europe, the inconsistent monthly jobs report and the ongoing scorched earth politics in washington, apparently you are feeling pretty good. consumer confidence jumped in september. take a look at that, by nine points. optimism about the jobs market drove that increase despite the fact we only added 96,000 jobs last month. let's see what we do when we get the jobs numbers on friday. not so bad, 96,000 jobs. never mind this week's forecast for higher inflation. that's not bothering you. or the puny increase that
? >> the reason they went into it, keep in mind, president obama has a science advisor john hold drum, one. hazards after free society is cheap energy. secretary chu getting solyndra and solar companies money. what their goal was as president obama stated to make energy rates skyrocket. only makes conceiveable sense in electricity and energy is in the stratosphere much more expensive. solar only begins to make sense. so that was the original plan. that didn't come through because congress failed to pass a climate bill which would have helped. president obama is doing everything he can to make energy more difficult when it comes to coal in the united states and other forms of drilling and things like that. so what's happened is it is ideology that is driving this policy. they want renewable energy. it is based on fear of man made global warming. they say we have to get off carbon based energy. need to do it fast. this is their ideology. that is why they're doing stuff that makes no sense. federal government as venture capitalist makes no sense. melissa: venture capitalist their record is no
with countries around the world to deepen ties of trade and investment, and science and technology, energy and development -- all efforts that can spark economic growth for all our people and stabilize democratic change. but such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school or ngo will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. for partnerships to be effective our citizens must be secure and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger -- one based on dividing the world between "us" and "them" -- not only sets back international cooperation, it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to these forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed in benghazi, a turkish police officer was murdered in istanbul only days before his wedding. more than 10 yemenis were killed in a car bomb in sana'a. several afghan children were mourned by their parents just days after they were ki
in the debate? >> well, there's a little pattern here. you can see that, and it follows the social science victims that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. so, you know, a as a wire servie that i'm normally into prognostication business but i feel very safe going out on a limb today. eight months ago in the state of the union speech, obama issued an appeal to congress to spend more federal money on construction projects that would generate jobs. what he said was, take the money we are no longer spending it for, use half of the to pay down our debt and use the rest to do some nationbuilding right here at home. well, we pointed out in a fact check that night the fallacy of that idea. the idea that some kind of budget surpluses going to be created when you stop the war is fiscal fiction. those wars have been primarily financed by borrowing. so if you stop the wars, you don't have pneumonia. you just have less borrowing, must debt being added. it doesn't create a pool of ready cash, and on top of that the supposed savings of this supposed peace dividend is inflated because
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> there ar lot of things that are right in the world today. it is a friday. the refs are back at work in the nfl. and on this last day of the third quarter the dow and s&p ontrack for the best monthly gain since june. this is the fourth month in a row. the big boy this morning the k shields and mainstay investments subsidiaries of new york life celebrating a recent launch of the mainstay municipal opportunities fund. with the nasdaq, starbucks celebrating a third anniversary. the instant coffee and recent launch of its system for at home brewing which by all accounts is getting off to a good start. >> yes. a big leadership conference coming up at starbucks. i believe in howard schultz. came on our show. i like this product. i like the fact europe might be turning. mostly i like the fact that when he gave one of these big meetings in new orleans a couple years ago, to get united states jump-started, it worked. i think he's got a clear bet. i like starbucks. >> you mentioned the possibility of europe turning. t
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] introducing a reason to look twice. the entirely new lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> welcome back. with 30 seconds on the clock, our next guest will tell us what else they think will move the markets tomorrow. . ward, let's kick it off with you. what do you want to look at tomorrow when the opening bell sounds? >> i think the growth rate will be similar to the second estimate. some compositional changes will portend for slower growth and will grow 1% to 1.5% in q3 and q4 paving the way for the fed to convert operation twist into a q.e. with purchases of 30-year treasury bonds. >> we'll watch that. dan, you're up for tomorrow's trading session? >> maria, the market's going to look at a couple of things. initial claims, durable goods, gdp as ward said. if they show weakness, the market could struggle a little more. but we look for companies with strong earnings, capability to grow and a so
the same paths tread by our pate arcs, abraham, isaac and jacob. but we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that's not the case in many other countries. for today a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of modernity seek a bright future in which the rights of all are protected in which an ever expanding digital library is available in the palm of every child in which every life is sacred. the forces of medievalism seek a world in which women and minorities are subjugated in which knowledge is suppressed, and in which not life but death is glorified. these forces clash around the globe. but nowhere more starkly than in the middle east. israel stands proudly with the forces of mod dernty. we protect the rights of all of our citizens, men and women, jews and arabs, muslims and christians, all are equal before the law. israel is also making the world a better place. our scientists winnow bell prizes. our know-how is in every cell phone and computer that
science professor in virginia. thank you so much for your time. we have romney and obama in virginia right now. we have this segment called purple rain for a rain. it's solidly purple, and this is an interesting race for many reasons in virginia. what are you watching? >> the problem in virginia for the romney campaign is they're on the defensive on all the issues, on the economy, women's issues, national security, all of issues that are important they're on the defensive right now. they don't have an issue opening to press the obama campaign on in virginia. they're behind on the economy, which was supposed to be president obama's weakness. so i think they're really in trouble in virginia. we've seen a slip on the part of the romney campaign since the convention, so whatever that convention bounces, it turned into a convention slide in virginia. we have a series of polls out now that show the gap widening between obama and romney. i think the romney campaign needs to find an opening, a gap to shoot in virginia on that issue. they need to press that gap. >> it's interesting you say that the
saw. first, computer sciences. google, western digital. these were seeing 30% to nearly 50% moves. on the downside, we saw amd having a 41% drop for the quarter. to give you a little bit of perspective on that competitor, intel down only about 14%. finally, the utilities was the worst performing sector this quarter. the only one up today. aes first energy was a lagger. it wasn't all bad news. nrg energy and american electric power were higher, as you can see there. a lit of a mix. when all is said and done, not a bad quarter, given both the domestic and international environments, the uncertainty we've seen, the election is coming. we did well for the third quarter. >> all right. sure did. thank you so much, jackie. don't even think about touching that remote. we have a lot more ahead on this friday edition of the "closing bell." >>> mortgage rates hit rock bottom again, so why aren't home sales blowing through the roof? housing in the spotlight up next. >>> and later, she's actually not crazy. the subsidized program for the poor has mushroomed since 2008 due to possible abuse. we
, science, reading and so forth and don't want to take chinese and mandarin it is okay. do i get that right? >> absolutely, yes. it's okay. >> having heard that, what's your beef? >> my beef is less about, on that a particular point. if you actually read the governor's article it is well written. the last paragraph you have to embrace and love but it is the arrogance that somehow we, in government, are smart enough with our crystal ball to see what the future is. i remember in the '80s, when i was signing up for grad school they wanted me to speak japanese because remember in the '80s, the japanese economy was going to rule the world. it's trying to let government sort of choose winners and losers and predict the future. how do you do -- hopefully where the governor will actually go is providing to give the students the choice. >> i don't think it is actually picking winners or losers when you say this is a language spoken by a billion people around the world. people who speak japanese today, by the way, have a good leg up. it is still an important part of our global economy. >> governor, t
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, edwards life sciences bucking the trend up 1.6% today after jeffrey boosted its revenue estimates starting this quarter saying it's seen strength from the company's heart valve. also raising its price target by 10 bucks to 125. keep in mind the fda is expected any day to approve an expansion of sepina's use to high-risk surgical patients noted by wells fargo yesterday. seeing a spike in this stock, at 107, spot 22. >>> the nasdaq with sema. >> reporter: a lot of big movers in tech. research in motion the best performing stock on the nasdaq 100 after reporting earnings last night. of course all eyes on that blackberry 10 device slated for the first half of 2013. facebook another big mover up 7%. pete najarian saying the sheryl sandberg interview on monday could be a catalyst to the stock similar to what we saw after mark zuckerberg spoke at that tech crunch conference. qualcomm, ubs writing that the near concerns related to the shipments could hit a soft patch in the next quarter. >>> today's power player is the chief investment strategist with oppenheimer funds with $82 billion under manag
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
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